Brass Forging

 

Brass forging

is a process in which a forging press places extreme pressure on a single piece of brass or brass alloy that has been heated to about 1,500 degrees F (815 degrees C). The softened metal is then forced, beaten, and shaped to produce a part made from a single piece of brass and free of imperfections. Different methods of brass forging can create just about any type of three-dimesional shape or form, weighing anywhere from a few ounces to several tons. The various types of brass forging include impression or closed die forging, open die forging, cold forging, and seamless rolled ring forging.

The brass forging process actually makes the metal around 15% stronger than mold cast parts as the process does not change the structure of the metal. Extruded brass stock is made into a shape already close to the final part that it will be forged into when the brass is heated. Forging brass parts reduces metal scrap and is faster than machining the parts. The forging process also produces a pore-free surface which makes for a more attractive brass part.